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3rd Floor Mardigian Library

 Today's Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Upcoming Hours

Current Exhibition

Global Glass: A Survey of Form and Function

February 7 - September 20


About the Exhibition

Leaf Vase, William Glasner, American b. 1947, blown and sandblasted glass, 1982, Gift of Vera Sattler
Leaf Vase, William Glasner, American b. 1947, blown and sandblasted glass, 1982, Gift of Vera Sattler

The history of glass is an international story of industrial, scientific, and artistic contributions forging a magnificent diversity of achievements both functional and sculptural. Based in the technical innovations of the industrial revolution, glass developed as an art form after World War II within the fine arts programs of American colleges and universities. Artists had designed limited-production, craft glass objects via manufacturers like Tiffany, Johns-Manville, and Corning, which had the facilities to produce the works. Artist Harvey Littleton broke through that constraint when he helped design equipment and processes that individual artists could use.

The origin of the contemporary American Studio Glass movement can be pinpointed to a workshop in 1962 by Harvey Littleton and chemist Dominick Labino at the Toledo Museum of Art. After Littleton introduced his students at the University of Wisconsin to glass as an alternative sculptural medium, visual arts departments across the country began offering instruction in glass. The Rhode Island School of Design provided classes in 1969 taught by Dale Chihuly, and by the mid-1970s, glass was an established presence in many studio art programs.

Global Glass: A Survey of Form and Function is a remarkable exhibition drawn from the extensive glass collection owned by the University of Michigan- Dearborn. The exhibition, which was featured at the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts from June until October of 2018, surveys important artists and works created from the mid-1960s to the present. Global Glass examines both functional glass objects and pure sculptural forms that have often taken cues from other fine arts media and movements in the U.S. and internationally. Among the 56 artists represented are glass giants Harvey Littleton, Howard Ben Tré, Dale Chihuly, Ann Robinson, and Kate Vogel. The exhibition has been curated by Don Desmett, independent curator and critic.

Hyperboloid, Harvey K. Littleton, American (1922-2013), blown glass, 1980, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Burnstein
Hyperboloid, Harvey K. Littleton, American (1922-2013), blown glass, 1980, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Burnstein
Vessel, Mattheis Klering, German, flameworked glass, 1980s, Gift of Donald and Carol Wiiken
Vessel, Mattheis Klering, German, flameworked glass, 1980s, Gift of Donald and Carol Wiiken

 
 
 

Exhibition Events

Opening Reception
Thursday, February 7, 2019 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Don Desmett, Independent Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art will speak at 6:00 p.m. Event is free to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres provided.

Tetev, Czeslaw Zuber, Polish b. 1948, glass block, cut, enameled and etched, 1986, Gift of Donald and Carol Wiiken
Tetev, Czeslaw Zuber, Polish b. 1948, glass block, cut, enameled and etched, 1986, Gift of Donald and Carol Wiiken
Stone Vessel, Curtiss R. Brock, American b.1961, acid-etched glass, ca. 1984, Gift of the Artist in Memory of Frank Scanlon
Stone Vessel, Curtiss R. Brock, American b.1961, acid-etched glass, ca. 1984, Gift of the Artist in Memory of Frank Scanlon

 
 

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The Alfred Berkowitz Gallery is located on the third floor of the Mardigian Library at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. For further information, see below for contact information. Anyone requiring accommodations under the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact (313)-593-5087.

Bill and Electra Stamelos


Electra was a remarkably gifted painter and Bill was an avid photographer. The couple loved to travel, and they acquired artwork from all over the world for their collection. Bill and Electra contributed greatly to the university's art collection for decades including donating the majority of Electra's body of work and many other art pieces that they collected throughout their years together. The couple also contributed a sizeable, and very generous, gift which, along with the support of other donors, will allow for the creation of the new Stamelos Gallery.

Bill and Electra Stamelos

Featured University Art Collection Piece

Featured collection glass artwork

Prisoner of Continuity, Scott Chaseling (b. 1962), blown, fused glass, n.d.
Gift of Richard and Louise Abrahams, Collection of UM-Dearborn (2014.1.8),
Photograph by Kip Kriigel


Australian glass artist Scott Chaseling (b. 1962) attended the Australian National University's Canberra School of Art in 1995. In a collaborative project with fellow glass artist Klaus Moje, the two artists invented the Australian Roll-Up technique. Their process is quite similar to the traditional Venetian murrini cane pick-up method with one major difference. Chaseling and Moje's concept involves picking up pre-fused panels of glass. This innovative approach allows artists to create carefully controlled designs that are not possible with traditional glassblowing methods. The pre-fused sheets of glass allow varying interior and exterior imagery, precise color placement, and full cross-sections of color, all seen in the skillful craftsmanship of this piece. After picking up the pre-fused panels on a punty, a glass blowing pipe, the final steps to the Australian Roll-Up technique consist of blowing, rolling and manipulating the glass form into a finished standing vessel shape.

---Laura Cotton, Art Curator and Gallery Manager

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